Science at the 2018 Winter Olympics - DiscoveryCampus
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Science at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Science at the 2018 Winter Olympics

21:33 08 February in Uncategorized
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Science at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Special Report

Special Report

Discover the physics of snowboarding, curling and skating, get inside the minds of athletes, and explore all things Olympics

A new study suggests there are limits to the “10,000-hour rule” and how far practice and hard work can take an athlete

August 5, 2016 — Karl J. P. Smith

The one time I went flying off the side of a mountain on skis, I certainly didn’t mean to. Before I hit the ground, there was a surprising amount of time for reflection—and more on the long painful schlep down to the ambulance

February 2, 2014 — Hilda Bastian

It’s harder than ever to dope your way to glory—but some athletes will probably get away with it anyway

August 5, 2016 — Bill Gifford

Athletes are injured frequently—badminton players more so than ski jumpers

August 1, 2012 — Mark Fischetti

Competitors at the most elite level require more than technical support

August 5, 2016 — Rachel Nuwer

Olympic competitors such as Apolo Ohno are down near the 2 percent body-fat range. How do they get so lean, and is it wise to do so?

February 19, 2010 — Katie Moisse

Science at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Discover the physics of snowboarding, curling and skating, get inside the minds of athletes, and explore all things Olympics


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